5 Essential PR Practices for Tech Companies

You may have heard about a little something called Pokemon Go. Tech companies like Niantic—the developers behind the hit mobile app—are certainly churning out a constant stream of new and innovative products. With that kind of pace and competition, a good public relations strategy is important to communicate the benefits of your killer new product to consumers.

Whether you’re a launching a new app or rolling out a brand new smartphone, you should incorporate these 5 essential practices to your PR strategy. 

Make your product story easily writable | Essential PR Practice

Make your product story easily writable | Essential PR Practice

Essential Practice 1:
Make your product story easily writable

Remember that you’re pitching to journalists and editors who sift through a lot of press material on a daily basis. Make sure that the stories you pitch are concisely written witch clear explanation of the technology you’re marketing.

“Although it may sound obvious, editors are more likely to use well-researched stories that will interest their readers than content that will take more work on their part to research,” writes marketing entrepreneur Zach Cutler for entrepreneur.com

Target media outlets specifically | Essential PR Practice

Target media outlets specifically | Essential PR Practice

Essential Practice 2:
T
arget media outlets specifically

Make sure that you craft stories specific to the target audiences of the media brands you’re pitching to. For example, product reviews belong to tech websites and tech sections of print titles, while company profiles might be better pitched to business-themed outlets. 

More isn’t always better | Essential PR Practice

More isn’t always better | Essential PR Practice

Essential Practice 3:
More isn’t always better

While the idea of pitching stories to more reporters will eventually yield more pick-ups, it’s not always the case. Cutler says that “narrowcasting” is a better strategy to ensure that quality articles come out about your products. “Consider which reporters would be most interested in the story and pitch smartly to those select few,” he suggests. 

Have support material ready | Essential PR Practice

Have support material ready | Essential PR Practice

Essential Practice 4:
Have support material ready

Journalists ask for things such as high-resolution product photos, a company profile, and other ancillary things that will help them understand your product better. They might also request for test units in case they want to get a firsthand feel for your product. This should be readily available before your media rounds so that you’re able to supply them when you’re asked. 

Essential Practice 5: Avoid hard selling | Essential PR Practice

Essential Practice 5: Avoid hard selling | Essential PR Practice

Essential Practice 5: Avoid hard selling

Sure, you could have the best tech product in the market right now, but if your PR material is too on-the-nose about pushing your product, journalists can easily overlook the important details. Remember, don’t just offer a product—offer context on why it’s so important. “[O]ffer interesting data, tips, insights on trends and other information editors will deem interesting and useful to their readers,” Cutler advises.

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