Understanding the Diverse PR Practices in East and Southeast Asia Part 2

In Part 1, M2Comms provided a brief glimpse of Vietnam and Japan. In Part 2, we take a look at a new set of ASEAN states.

MYANMAR

MYANMAR

Myanmar

In the wake of the country's first democratic elections in 2015, Myanmar's prospects grow optimistic as the country thaws out the vestiges of its formerly dismal human rights record.

The political change has had a deep impact on Burmese PR practice. For one, media is now freer. Censorship was lifted in 2012, and state-controlled TV gave way to competition from private channels. The economic gains resulting from these changes are hugely responsible for the growing popularity of the television, which gradually replaced the radio.

Mobile and IT penetration is relatively low but is expected to increase in the near future. In light of the Burmese media renaissance, the country’s PR industry is maturing rapidly. Unlike in other nations which enjoyed a period dominated by print and broadcast, both traditional and digital avenues in Myanmar are pursued with the same energy and level, often resulting in an integrated PR approach.

MALAYSIA

MALAYSIA

Malaysia

Owing to its rapid economic growth, Malaysia has been hailed both a Tiger economy and a Newly Industrialized Country. Rapid advances in social networking, mobile technology, and Instant Messaging (IM) apps are changing the general population's pattern of media consumption.

Approximately 60 percent of Malaysian internet users browse social media networks on a daily basis, and more than half use IMs. The explosive growth of social has caused numerous brands to take the plunge and directly engage consumers on social networks with the help of PR pros. Traditional media still has a strong foothold, however, with many spending time on television for about an hour and a half every evening.

PHILIPPINES

PHILIPPINES

Philippines

In the early 2000s, the Philippines earned the distinction as the world’s social networking capital, a recognition that remained in succeeding years. Up to 90 percent of the country's 44.2 million internet users are active on social media. While digital media is huge in the country, traditional media still has its legs.

TV and radio ratings have slowly risen with the country's ever-diversifying tastes in media, pushing local PR practitioners to take on a more sophisticated, integrated, and multi-channel approach to storytelling in an effort to stand out in the incredibly saturated Philippine market.

In the Art of War, Sun Tzu declared that he who knows himself, knows his enemies, and he knows the terrain will never lose a battle. This message continues to hold true in today's highly competitive PR scene, where well-crafted, diverse, and localized content yields consistently favorable results.